Home Institutes
RUB » iMOS » institutes

HOME INSTITUTES

Simon Ebbinghaus: Protein Solvation and Aggregation

The Ebbinghaus group is interested in studying biomolecular structure, function and aggregation directly in cellular environments. Therefore, special in-cell techniques are used and the results are interpreted by comparative in vitro experiments in cell-like environments and dilute solutions.

read more



Christof Hättig: Quantum Chemistry

The Hättig group is working on a number of projects concerned with the accurate description of interactions between molecules and of molecules with surfaces, solvents and external (e.g. electric or magnetic) fields. The main tools for these investigations are the well-known quantum chemistry package TURBOMOLE, to which they also contribute as a development group, and the quantum chemistry packages DALTON, CFOUR, and Molpro.

read more



Martina Havenith-Newen: Laser Spectroscopy and Biophotonics

Kinetic THz absorption (KITA) has been developed by the Havenith group as a tool to probe changes in solvation dynamics upon biological function. KITA studies of protein folding in real time revealed that changes in solvent dynamics are coupled to secondary structure formation of the protein.

read more



Christian Herrmann: Protein Interactions

he Herrmann group investigates the interactions of proteins with other proteins and small molecules like water and co-solvents by means of biophysical and structural techniques. Thereby, they address the mechanism of biological processes (signal transduction) and, in addition, they want to elucidate the quantitative relationship between protein complex structures and the underlying binding energetics.

read more



Dominik Marx: Ab Initio Simulations

The general theme of the Marx research group consists in understanding structure, dynamics, and chemical reactions of complex molecular many-body systems - bridging the gap between chemistry and physics. The aim is to capture nature as closely as possible by theoretical means - the basic entities being nuclei and electrons.

read more



Karina Morgenstern: Atomistic and Molecular Structures and Dynamics

The research methods of Physical Chemistry I are the Scanning Tunnelling Spectroscopy, Spectroscopy with STM, Inelastic Electron Tunneling Spectroscopy, IET manipulation, Femtochemistry on the nanoscale, FTIR-Spectroscopy, High Resolution Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS).

read more



Christian W. Müller: Conformational Isomerization of Biomolecules

The Müller group focuses on a systematic bottom-up study of intra- and intermolecular interactions stabilizing the conformational structures of biological building blocks. They combine laser spectroscopic UV-UV, IR-UV, and Raman-UV double-resonance techniques with mass spectrometric ion detection to record conformation-specific UV, IR, and Raman spectra.

read more



Martin Muhler: Heterogeneous Catalysis

The Muhler group performs fundamental research in the area of heterogeneous catalysis and aims to develop catalysts based on mechanistic insight. The scientific challenge is the elucidation of the reactions on the atomic level and their interplay with the complex surface chemistry of heterogeneous catalysts, which usually consist of many phases and components, often present as nanoparticles or as X-ray amorphous layers.

read more



Wolfram Sander: Physical Organic Chemistry

The focus of the Sander group is in the field of physical organic chemistry. The ambitious goals of physical organic chemistry are to predict structures and properties of reactants, transition states, and products of any reaction and thus to predict the course of chemical reactions.

read more



Rochus Schmid: Computational Materials Chemistry

The research of the Schmid group focuses on the development and application of theoretical methods for the simulation of complex systems in materials chemistry on an atomistic level. All the projects have in common that they strive to devise atomistic models which are able to bridge the length- and time-scales and thus to overcome the intrinsic problem in the simulation of materials systems.

read more





  • For further information on the research groups of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry please refer to the page “Chairs and Workgroups”.
  • For further information on the research groups of the Research Department Interfacial Systems Chemistry (RD IFSC) please refer to the page “Scientists”.