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BSc Lehrveranstaltungen


176 201 Exogene Prozesse - 2. Semester - Dozent A. Immenhauser
Ziel dieses Kurses ist es einen Überblick über die fundamentalen Prozesse an der Erdoberfläche, in den Ozeanen und der Atmosphäre zu gewinnen. Dabei werden immer wieder andere Planenten unseres Sonnensystems als Vergleichsobjekte herangezogen. Eine Hauptfrage ist: Wie funktioniert das System Erde? Die Themen sind: 1 - Das Archiv unseres Planeten; 2 - Die frühe Erde; 3 - System Erde, Interaktion von Sonneneinstrahlung, Ozeanen und Atmosphäre; 4 - Gaia, Klima und der Thermostat der Erde; 5 - Landschaft, Erosion, Verwitterung und Transport von Sedimenten; 6 - Der Wasserkreislauf; 7 - Ozeane: Physiographie, Hurrikane, Wellen, Gezeiten, Gyren, CCD und die Coriolis Kraft; 8 - Wind, Staub und Wüsten; 9 - Eis und Gletscher; 10 - Klima & Mensch. Klausur: Schriftlich. Das Vorlesungsmaterial wird in Blackboard bereitgestellt.

176 302 Erdgeschichte - 3. Semester - Dozenten O. Kwiecien, S. Chakraborty, J. Renner, K. Stevens
This series of interdisciplinary team-taught lectures (Ringvorlesung), brings together expertise of several lecturers and provides the fundamentals of Historical Geology and gives an integrated view of the evolution of our planet, oceans, continents, life and climate. At the beginning of the semester, the students learn about the universal processes shaping Earth's history (thermal balance, internal and external heat sources, rock cycle, water and carbon cycle, BLAG hypotheis) and, in due course, how these processes operated in the boundary conditions changing through time (co-evolution of geosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere). Each stratigraphic epoch is characterized by highlighting its plate-tectonic configuration, important tectonic events, typical rock types, climatic patterns and the most important faunal and floral developments. Examination: Written exam. Lectures are given in German. All course materials are available on Blackboard

176 401 Einführung in die Sedimentologie - 3. Semester - Dozenten A. Immenhauser, S. Riechelmann, F.T. Meyer
Ziel dieses B.Sc. Kurses ist es einen Überblick über die Grundlagen der Sedimentologie zu vermitteln. Dabei werden sowohl aktualistische Ablagerungsräume als auch fossile Sedimentgesteine behandelt. Die Themen sind: 1) Grundtypen der Sedimente: Karbonate, Siliziklastika, Evaporite und Kieselsedimente, Böden. 2) Sedimentäre Strukturen. 3) Vom Lockersediment zum Sedimentgestein. 4) Grundbegriffe der Stratigraphie. 5) Ablagerungsräume: Gebirge und Hügellandschaften. 6) Ablagerungsräume: Flüsse und Seen. 7) Ablagerungsräume: Vulkanische Sedimente. 8) Ablagerungsräume: Küsten- und Schelfsedimente. 9) Ablagerungsraum: Offen marine (pelagische) Sedimente. 10) Ablagerungsräume: Organogene Sedimente und Sedimentäre Erze. 11) Ausgewählte Themen moderner Forschung in der Sedimentgeologie. Klausur: Schriftlich. Das Vorlesungsmaterial wird im Blackboard bereitgestellt.

176 509 Bachelor-Kartierung Südspanien - Carboneras - 5. Semester - Dozenten A. Immenhauser, R. Hoffmann, O. Kwiecien
Ziel der Bachelor-Kartierung (14 Tage) ist es ein mehrere km2, lithologisch und tektonisch relativ anspruchsvolles Gebiet kartographisch zu erfassen. Dabei spielen vor allem 3-D Denken und Gesteinsansprache eine Rolle. Nebenbei soll das Begehen von mittelschwerem Gelände geübt werden. Die Kartiergebiete nördlich Carboneras umfassen Teile eines Neogenen Sedimentbeckens mit seinem Grundgebirge. Die aufgeschlossenen Gesteine schließen Kristallin (metamorph und nicht-metamorph) und Sedimentgesteine sowie junge Lockergesteine ein. Das Vorlesungsmaterial wird in Blackboard bereitgestellt.


176 507 Earth History (Erdgeschichte) - 5. Semester - staff involved: A. Immenhauser, O. Kwieczien
This course provides the fundamentals of Historical Geology and gives an integrated view of the evolution of oceans, continents, climate and life on the planet. Starting with the birth of the galaxy, the entire 4.5 billion year lasting history of the Earth is presented. Each stratigraphic epoch is characterized by highlighting its plate-tectonic configuration, important tectonic events, typical rock types, climatic patterns and the most important faunal and floral elements. In this course, students are forced to learn most of the content by self-study, based on a comprehensive accompanying booklet (167 pp, available on the intranet). A total of four summary lectures are given, which provide a chunky abridgement of the corresponding topic. Examination: Written exam. The booklet is in English, lectures are given in German. All course materials are available on Blackboard

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MSc Lehrveranstaltungen


177 691 Paleoclimate and Climate Change - 7. and 9. Semester - staff involved: O. Kwiecien
Climate change, a theme of global social and economic significance is widely discussed in media. Most attention is paid to the issue of global warming, regarding its nature, causes, and consequences. Human impact on climate is a subject of particularly hot debates. In order to understand recent changes and forecast the future ones we need to comprehend factors forcing Earth's climate. The only way to achieve this goal is investigating the climate of the past. Here two aspects play crucial role: different time scales (tectonic, orbital, millennial, centennial, decadal) and internal feedbacks between different components of a climate system (cryosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere). Anchored in this context, the curse will focus on information, which can be teased out different climatic archives (ice cores, marine and lacustrine sediments, speleothems, tree rings) by the use of different proxies (stable isotopes, biomarkers, elemental and mineral composition, faunal assemblages, growth rate). Important element of each class are exercises serving as a teaching self-control and providing hands-on experience on discussed topics. Examination: Written exam. All course materials are available on Blackboard.

176 706 Sedimentäre Systeme I /Sedimentary Systems I - 7. Semester - staff involved: A. Immenhauser
This M.Sc. course deals with large-scale sedimentary systems in all its aspects. The focus is presently on carbonate factories in tropical, coolwater and mound facies. The aim is to provide students with a general understanding of processes that shape carbonate depositional environenments throughout Earth history. Here we deal with topics such as platform geometries, controlling factors of carbonate deposition, carbonate sequence stratigraphy, applied carbonate sedimentology, carbonate geochemistry, paleoceanography of carbonate systems. The students contribute actively to the teaching and read and discuss papers. Examination: Oral presentations. The course material is available on Blackboard.

176 855 Sedimentäre Systeme II /Sedimentary Systems II - Sequence Stratigraphy - 8. Semester - staff involved: A. Immenhauser
This MSc. course is designed to introduce students in the concepts of sequence stratigraphy. Focus is on a broad overview of the different fields involved. Lectures are combined with exercises and paper lecture. Students present short talks dealing with the various aspects of accommodation change, relative-sea-level change and sediment influx. Examination: Written essay on different topics in Sequence Stratigraphy. The course material is available on Blackboard.

176 916 Biomineralisation - 9. Semester - staff involved: A. Immenhauser
This advanced M.Sc. course deals with all aspects of bio-induced and biologically controlled mineralisation. Whereas we deal with a number of biominerals, the focus is on carbonate and silica minerals. The fundaments of biomineralization are discussed. After a general introduction including the changes of the ambient seawater chemistry through time, we deal with aspects such as membranes and ion channels. Another topic of interest includes microbes as biomineralizers. In the second part of this course, the focus is on a number of organisms including corals, bivalves, foraminifera and coccoliths. The students contribute actively to the teaching and read and discuss papers. Examination: Oral presentations. The course material is available on Blackboard.

176 955 Scientific writing for M.Sc. and Ph.D. students - staff involved: A. Immenhauser
The aims of this course are threefold: (i) to compile a number of basic rules of thumbs for scientific writing; (ii) to understand how the scientific peer review system works; (iii) to understand how the scientific editing and publishing system works. (i) Papers submitted by PhD students are often characterised by a number of very typical features that are regularly criticized by reviewers. Many, if not all, of these "problems" could be easily avoided if known in advance. We will use real-world examples and papers by the participants in order to compile a list of these points of criticism and see how to avoid them. (ii) This course part is strictly practical. We will use real world examples of papers that have been submitted to the journal Sedimentology and follow the review process step for step. This includes that we will read the original version, the reviewer's comments (analyze them), see how the editor deals with the comments, follow the authors whilst they accommodate the reviewer's comments and so on and so forth until the final acceptance or rejection of the paper. (iii) In this module, a number of representative journals will be discussed in terms of their guidelines for authors and we will analyze how their editing system works. The course material is available on Blackboard

176 812 Field mapping course III - Hydra - 8. Semester - staff involved: D. Richter, A. Immenhauser
Aim of this M.Sc. mapping course (14 days) is the geological mapping of several km2 of a tectonically and lithologically demanding field area, situated on the Greek Island of Hydra. The main focus of the field course is on the evolution of an Upper Triassic reef-basin system and its polyphase tectonic deformation. The basic lithologies encountered during mapping will include Permian to Jurassic shallow-water carbonates and deep-water deposits as well as pyroclastics. The emphasis of the course is on carbonate and siliciclastic sediments, depositional environments and synsedimentary tectonics and their appearance in the field. Apart from mapping, sedimentary logging exercises will be carried out and several day trips around the island will be done to provide a comprehensive view of the geological structure of the entire Island of Hydra. Examination: Report including lithological logs, cross sections and map.

176 951 Sedimentologisches Praktikum - 9. Semester - staff involved: S. Riechelmann, T.F. Meyer, R.D. Neuser, O. Kwiecien
Aim of this practical M.Sc. course is to provide an overview on the most common laboratory methods and techniques for the study of sediments and sedimentary rocks. This includes sieving and elutriation of unconsolidated sediments, quantitative thin-section analysis, sedimentological core description, interpretation of wireline logs, qualitative and quantitative palynofacies analysis, cathodoluminescence microscopy (CL), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffractometry (XRD). After a short introduction of the method by the lecturers, students will actively apply the different laboratory techniques. The hands-on training will include analysis of provided sample material as well as documentation and interpretation of the measured results. Examination: Report presenting the different exercises and results.

176 904 Geochemical proxies and their applications in biogeochemistry and paleoceanography - 7. Semester - staff involved: A. Niedermayr
Stable isotopes and elemental proxies represent important tools to investigate the processes and factors which control climate and biogeochemical cycling of the major elements today as well as in the distant past. The aim of this M.Sc. course is to provide on overview on the most common geochemical proxy indicators currently in use for the reconstruction of past environmental conditions (e.g. ocean temperatures and circulation, ecosystem productivity, oxygenation, atmospheric pCO2) and of biogeochemical cycling. Following a short introduction on stable isotope geochemistry and up-to-date analytical techniques, the operation mode of the major biogeochemical cycles (C, N, S, H) and their interaction with the hydrosphere, atmosphere and bio- ad lithosphere will be discussed. Different isotope systems (δ13C,δ15N, δ34S, δD, δ18O, 87Sr/86Sr) and other geochemical proxies (e.g. C/N, Mg/Ca, TEX86) will be introduced and examples for their application from Earth history will be given. The students contribute actively to the teaching and read and discuss papers. Examination: Oral presentation. The course material is available on Blackboard.

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